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Visiting an Urban, Urban Farm

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I like to call what we do Urban Farming. The truth is that we live in a community of 50,000 people and have an acreage on the edge of Grand Island. We live on a suburban acreage. We play at farming and enjoy running our CSA but both Kathy and I have full time jobs and we are not supporting ourselves or our family with our farm. The first week of May we visited The Urban Farming Guys in Kansas City MO.

The are a real urban farm located in a first ring suburb of Kansas City just 1.9 miles from downtown KC. They bought their first house in the neighborhood 10 years ago for $21,000. They have continued to buy other houses, buildings and lots in the neighborhood. They operate a green house and urban farm. They have had a CSA and have a community room and maker space. We rented two of their houses via AirBnB for a weekend to celebrate my nephew’s high school graduation. Candy was gracious enough to give us a tour of the green house and farm. The Urban Farming Guys have a great YouTube Channel check it out. If you are traveling to KC look them up on AirBnB it was a great experience.

Adventures in Urban Farming – Home

Posted by Adventures in Urban Farming on Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Chad Nabity

Seeds and seed catalogs Kathy thinks maybe we have a problem is anything

Posted by Chad Nabity on Saturday, February 9, 2019

If you are interested in the local food movement… – Adventures in Urban Farming

If you are interested in the local food movement and supporting small and micro businesses this is a really important…

Posted by Adventures in Urban Farming on Saturday, January 26, 2019

Just What is in a Full Share?

We plant a wide variety of crops. You will start the season with cool weather and spring crops: Lettuce, greens (chard, mustard, spinach, collard), radishes, garlic scapes, rhubarb and winter onions. During the warmer months you can expect green beans (several varieties), summer squash, greens (chard, mustard, spinach, collard) , herbs, cabbage, onions, new potatoes and fennel. The summer crops will continue some of those above and add in tomatoes (last year we planted 39 varieties), peppers, egg plant, garlic, celery and sweet corn (we don’t grow it but buy it from a local producer). As we transition in to the fall months we will still have tomatoes, peppers, egg plant, onions, potatoes, greens (chard, mustard, spinach, collard) , maybe green beans, and add in winter squash, popcorn (if the squirrels don’t eat it again this year), horse radish root, apples, and maybe pumpkins or corn shocks for decoration.

In 2019 there will be 18 Wednesdays between June 6, 2019 and October 2, 2019. We plan to have at least 18 weeks of shares but we could have as many as 20 if we have things ready for the last week of May and have a final pick up after October 2. This last 2 seasons we have had a last pickup in mid-October. The cost for a full season share is $400. The full amount has to be paid by March 1 to secure your spot. If you are a returning member we do offer a 10% discount if you sign up and pay by February 16.

The Short Season share is similar to the Full Share but does start later in the summer and only includes 6 weeks. We plan to start it in July and end in late August or early September. Shares will not be available every week depending on our schedule. Short season shares are $150 and available on Sunday afternoons.

If you are worried that you won’t be able to use everything, and this can be an issue, you can always find someone to share with or donate the extra.

You can pick your season and sign up by following this link: GI Acres CSA Share Types.

Getting Ready for 2019

CSA Day is on February 22 of 2019. If you are a returning CSA Member we are offering $40 off of a full membership if you sign up before February 16. A full membership will be $400 after that date. We will be offering 10 full memberships and 6 short season memberships again this year. Full memberships will be approx 20 weeks from the first of June to the end of September. Short season will begin in July and end in September and include 6 pickups. Short season shares are $150.

It was a very productive Memorial Day Weekend in the Garden

A combination of the weather and our travel schedule has kept us out of the garden and put us a bit behind.  We got all of our plant in the garden over Memorial Day weekend but we still have seed to plant.  The weekend was really hot (record setting high temp and record setting high (low) temps).  It was over 90 degrees all three days of the weekend right up until the downpour on Monday afternoon.  We did get a lot accomplished just not as much as we hoped.  It looks like the first week’s share will include fresh herbs (chives, green garlic, mint, oregano, sage and maybe some others) fresh greens (Salad, Mustard, Chard). winter onions, rhubarb, eggs (if we can get cartons) and radishes.  We might even throw in some young horseradish root.

And the Garden is a Go

We finally got to spend a day in the garden.  Between the weather, holidays and travelling it has been slow this year.  The weather this year has been frightful.  The first potatoes went in on Good Friday and we got snow for Easter.  Then we had snow or ice every weekend until the end of April.  Kathy got two new colonies of bees installed on April 18th.  We were worried that it might be too cold for them.  We left the next day for New Orleans.  Chad was attending and speaking at the American Planning Association conference.

The weather turned gorgeous while we were gone.  The last weekend of April we picked up the first of our plants from Barb’s Greenhouse in St. Libory.  We got 3 kinds of cabbage, (golden acre, kalibos, and murdoc) and 3 kinds of broccoli (romensco, purple santee, and happy rich).  The last two are more sprouting broccoli than heads of broccoli. We also picked up leeks and shallots and a few other random plants.

We started laying out the garden and put in fence for peas and beans and planted the cabbages and peas on Saturday. Kathy also checked on the bees and discovered that while they were doing fine and the  Sunday we hope to get the broccoli, leeks and shallots planted.  We also have a couple of apricot trees that need to get in the ground.

We do still have 2 full shares available and 4 short season shares if you know anyone that would be interested. Send them to our signup page.

Found some cool food and veggie videos check them out

Check out the cool chives video from the lyrical chef MackaB.  We will post other videos by him and you can subscribe to his Youtube page if you like them.

We do still have shares available for the 2018 season, both full shares and short season shares.

 

 

Week 17, September 20, 2017

We are coming to a close for the season.  I anticipate that we will only have one more week this year.  Maybe 2 but that will be dependent on the weather.  There is no pick up next week but the last will be Sunday October 8.  This week included melons and winter squash.  We also included fall decorations, gourds, pumpkins and corn shocks.  Food is the primary purpose of a CSA but beauty, (flowers and decorative items) is also a part of the contract.  We truly want people to connect to nature and we connect by what we eat and by what we see.

About GI Acres CSA

GI Acres is located on the western edge of Grand Island, Nebraska. The garden takes up about half of an acre. We also have chickens, rabbits and bees

Our farm is not USDA Certified Organic and we do not anticipate applying for such status. We strive to produce healthy vegetables using natural methods of fertilizing, building soil, and controlling pests such as insects and weeds. Those healthy vegetables will begin in mid to late May with herbs, asparagus, rhubarb and strawberries. During the season you can expect a variety of greens, beans, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, squash, corn and potatoes along with tips about how to cook and preserve your weekly share. The season will conclude in late September or early October. We aim for a 20-week season.

We did not grow up on farms but we did grow up in families with large gardens, eating a variety of fresh produce and canning/freezing the excess. We have maintained the tradition of growing and preserving food for our family for the past 20+ years. GI Acres is our attempt to share that passion for good food with our community.